Monday, March 30, 2015

Jack Davidson @ THEODORE:Art



Installation view.



 you said something i've never forgotten (left) and trying to get over





From the Press Release:

Theodore:Art is pleased to present an exhibition of new paintings and wall work by Jack Davidson.

Retinal Noise.

Everything is related. The community and the arena of life are the boundaries of expression of what, in modern times, we knew as privacy. We have now fallen into a social network which surprises both for its flexibility and for its tendency towards an enormous abyss of meaning.

Painting in this time of the present-continuous cruelly confronts the communicative core of reality. It prefers a direct relationship with the world, one without degrees of separation. It is important to see how an ever increasingly anachronistic medium, with regard to the dictatorship of immediacy, renders us disobedient.

The epidermis of the world’s retina, which is how we can refer to Jack Davidson’s work, is conscious of strangeness and belonging at the same time. Jack ironically sympathizes with already existing images – from record covers to vestiges of his biography – metabolizes them, and then restores them to what is a more open reading, always maintaining a faithful, but never dogmatic, allegiance to the discipline of painting.

This procedure of his is a kinetic-cognitive drift similar to that of the flâneur, someone able to do as many different jobs as there are ways of seeing. He propounds a new artificiality that depends on recognition, because images don’t have a mother tongue, but are an adopted language.

To Jack, music is as much nutrient as information. In our life, the important questions appear as news in the guise of documents; living is thus the dictatorship of information. Jack separates the noise of music from the information prior to painting, but always so he can mix them up again, like an interpreter who doesn’t owe his life to a recognizable score.

On his walks he looks for what is hidden between routine meditations and the slowing down of repetition, therefore we sense almost secret geometries among the painting planes, and difficult and improbable color decisions that are virtuosic without being capricious.

For this exhibition Jack has designed a viewing bench in which he has taken the precaution of leaving the least defined, most open, place for a third person; two people make a conversation,but the third decides the subject. The seat of the bench is composed of his sewn together paint rags. We sit on his corrections, as on the strict materiality of painting.

Javier Peñafiel. Barcelona, 2015.





Installation view.



 back down the goldbourne road we go, 2014, oil and enamel on canvas, 18 x 15 in.



Installation view with i want to lead the sporting life, 2014 (on right).




Jack Davidson: love, mistake, promise, auto crackup, color, petal

Through April 12, 2015

56 Bogart
Brooklyn, NY 11206

Friday, March 27, 2015

RIP Albert Irvin (1922 - 2015)


Albert Irvin by ©Josh Wright



Very sorry to hear of the passing of one of my favorite painters, Albert Irvin -  an incredible painter and by all accounts a wonderful man.

The evocative portrait above is by Josh Wright.

Obituary in the Guardian.

In the Studio with Albert Irvin by Sam Cornish from 2012.

Interview: John Jones London 

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Matt Ducklo @ Launch F18


240, 2013, gelatin silver print, 24 x 20 inches.




From the Press Release:

Ducklo has lived and worked in Memphis, Tennessee for the past five years, having returned after a decade in New York City. The photographs on view arose from indiscriminate night drives he began to take in Memphis. Gradually, photographing became part of these excursions turning the open drive into a restless search. Taking advantage of nocturnal stillness to explore the city, Ducklo found a rich topology of light, shadow, and silence, touchstones among the uncanny.
 Against this backdrop, Ducklo shows us varied pictures that include neighborhoods, parking lots, a jail, a school gym, the densely forested city park, a public sculpture, and a bus stop. Many of the pictures presented depict church vans, secured in cages, protected from theft. This recurring signpost of confinement and protection acts as a refrain to the diverse images of a city at night. The language within Ducklo's work reverberates what is known to be true; day follows night, but sometimes tomorrow is a long time.

Matt Ducklo was born in 1973 in Memphis, TN and continues to live and work there. He attended The University of Tennessee (BA) and Yale University (MFA). Ducklo’s solo exhibitions include Eleven Rivington, NY; Bellwether, NY; Elizabeth Dee, NY; and The Power House, Memphis, TN. Group exhibitions include Franklin Street Works, Stanford, CT; Derek Eller Gallery, NY; and The Queens Museum of Art, NY, among others. Matt Ducklo joined Launch F18 in February 2015.




Matt Ducklo: Tomorrow is a Long Time

Opening March 25, 6 - 8 pm

March 25 - April 26, 2015

94 Allen Street
New York, NY 10002

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Kazuo Shiraga and Satoru Hoshino @ Dominique Lévy


 Installation view of work by Kazuo Shiraga.



Detail from above.








Detail from above.





From the Press Release:
Body and Matter: The Art of Kazuo Shiraga and Satoru Hoshino is curated by Koichi Kawasaki, former director of Ashiya City Museum of Art and History in Japan. This exhibition places a group of 23 important abstract paintings made over the course of the fifty-year career of legendary Gutai artist Kazuo Shiraga, in dialogue with a series of nine works from the 1990s by Satoru Hoshino, . . . . 

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Charline von Heyl @ Petzel Gallery




Artist, Debra Ramsay takes a closer look.



Detail of work (on left) from photo above.







From the Press Release:

Petzel Gallery is delighted to announce the inauguration of our new uptown location with an exhibition of early paintings by Charline von Heyl. The group of paintings assembled was previously exhibited in Cologne and Munich between 1991 and 1995, before the artist moved to New York. This will be the first showing of the work in the United States. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalog with an interview between Isabelle Graw and the artist.

Cologne in the late 1980s was dominated by a debate about the merits and pitfalls of painting. If there was any point of agreement, it was in rejection of the mythic landscapes of Anselm Kiefer and the gestural marks of the internationally acclaimed neo-expressionists. However esoteric the arguments about painting may seem today, they helped clarify a skeptical position on painterly authenticity that was adopted by artists such as Martin Kippenberger and Albert Oehlen, friends and colleagues of von Heyl.

After studying with Joerg Immendorff in Hamburg, Charline von Heyl moved to Düsseldorf in the early 90s and worked for his studio. Düsseldorf’s geographic location gave the artist enough critical distance to ferment her own ideas away from the quagmire of the Cologne art scene. She began exhibiting her work in 1990, at Christian Nagel Galerie in Cologne. At the time, the gallery’s focus was on conceptual and contextual art. Von Heyl was its only unabashed painter. Her insistence provoked a dynamic and confrontational new dialog about painting in general and her work in particular, apart from the already established painting positions reigning in the Cologne of the eighties.

The paintings for von Heyl’s exhibition at Petzel were selected in light of her most recent show at the gallery in September of 2013. The early canvases can give an insight to her current works. In particular, von Heyl has never distinguished abstract from representational form, rather, she has used all the visual tools at her disposal to lure the viewer into her compositions. The early paintings juxtapose textured fields of color with emblems that have the ability to allude to skin tone, nature, and industrial elements, among other motifs. Now and then her paintings function like a visual oxymoron: funny but not humorous, fluidly painted yet collaged, both experimental and expertly composed. Von Heyl treads into the unfamiliar, finding a place beyond language, discourse and argument that can only be articulated in painting.





Painter James Erikson takes in von Heyl's work from the early 90s.







Installation view.



Charline von Heyl: Düsseldorf Paintings from the Early 90s

Through May 2, 2015

Petzel Gallery
35 E 67th Street
New York, NY 10065

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Anon, No More Anon


A still of Leonard Whiting in Romeo and Juliet (1968)



Hi Friends,

While I gratefully appreciate all who check out my blog posts and take the time to comment I have decided I will no longer publish comments posted anonymously.

Everyone has been respectful in their remarks towards me and the work and artists I post but frankly, I just think it's polite to let everyone know who we are conversing with.

I realize it's quicker to post an anonymous comment than to sign in to blogger so, even when using the Anonymous option, I will ask that you please sign your post and perhaps leave a link so we can all check out your art or your own blog.

Take care and thanks again for looking!


Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Walter Darby Bannard @ Berry Campbell


Aqua Same, 1962, alkyd resin on canvas, 66 3/4 x 62 3/4 in.



Walter Darby Bannard: Minimal Color Field Paintings 1958 - 1965

Opening: Thursday, March 19, 6 - 8 PM

March 19 - April 18, 2015

530 W 24th Street
New York, NY 10011